What Does the Smoke From my Exhaust Mean?

Diesel-Exhaust
If you see different colored exhaust fumes it’s time to pay attention to your car. Even if your vehicle isn’t flashing any warning lights, the smoke coming from your exhaust is a signal that something might not be working properly.

*What does BLUE smoke from my exhaust mean?

If your car is blowing blue smoke, it’s a clear sign that the engine is burning oil. What happens is that the valve guide seals or piston rings are worn out, and oil is leaking past from where it should be lubricating the moving parts, to the combustion chamber where it’s being burned up with the fuel.

If you’re seeing this kind of smoke, check your oil regularly and watch for consumption issues. While an issue that normally should require immediate attention and expensive repairs, including some internal replacement parts, if you’re vehicle is old and the leak is minimal, it can be carefully managed by topping up the oil on a regular basis.

Along with environmental damage, burning oil can cause rough starts, as the process can ruin the car’s spark plugs.

There is another reason for blue smoke, and that’s if the car is turbocharged; the smoke being a sign that the blower is in need of rebuilding or replacement.

 

*What does GRAY smoke from my exhaust mean?1158-270x169

Gray smoke is hard to diagnose directly. Like blue smoke, it can mean that the car is burning oil or suffering from a bad turbocharger. Take the same precautions as with blue smoke, and check for excessive oil consumption.

Gray smoke can also be an issue with your automatic transmission fluid getting burned up in the engine. A faulty transmission vacuum modulator would be the culprit in this situation, leading to transmission fluid getting sucked into the engine and getting burned up.

Furthermore, gray smoke could mean a stuck PCV valve. The PCV system (Positive Crankcase Ventilation) cuts down on harmful emissions by recycling them back into the combustion chamber. However, when the PCV valve gets stuck, pressure can build and lead to oil leaks. Fortunately, PCV valves aren’t expensive, and can be a quick job for a mechanic or a do-it-yourselfer.

 

*What does WHITE smoke from my exhaust mean?

White smoke can be nothing to be concerned about if it’s thin, like vapor. This is probably the result of normal condensation buildup inside the exhaust system. This kind of smoke disappears quickly.

However, thicker smoke is a big problem, and can be caused the engine burning coolant. This can be the result of a serious issue like a blown head gasket, a damaged cylinder head, or a cracked engine block – all of which are costly repairs.

Don’t ignore it, however, as the problem could become far worse. Even a small leak in the coolant can lead to overheating and serious risk of damage to the engine. A coolant leak can also mix with oil and cause serious headaches for you and your car.

 

*What does BLACK smoke from my exhaust mean?Smoke11-270x202

Black exhaust smoke means the engine is burning too much fuel. The first think you should check is your air-filter and other intake components like sensors, fuel injectors and the fuel-pressure regulator. Other reasons could be a clogged fuel return line. Black smoke is usually the easiest issue to diagnose and fix, but burning unnecessary fuel will definitely affect your fuel economy, so don’t think of avoiding this one to save money, it won’t work.

Any smoke coming from your car’s exhaust pipe is a sign that your car is in distress. Pay attention to what it needs to ensure more miles for your vehicle.

By John Hoffner • April 22, 2013 • 2:00 pm • Leave a comment

Exhaust Service

Whenever we talk about exhaust service, most people normally think about exhaust pipes and mufflers. Well, actually, exhaust service is a lot more comprehensive these days. For example, catalytic converters were mandated in 1976 and on-board emission control computers in 1990. Governmental emissions requirements have forced manufacturers to come up with much more sophisticated ways to comply with environmental regulations.

Exhaust service has really become exhaust and emissions service. High-tech computer controlled emissions devices are now a big part of exhaust service. Because it is so sophisticated, your vehicle manufacturer recommends you have your emission system checked out by a qualified Houston exhaust technician regularly to make sure everything is working right – usually every 6 months or 10,000 miles/16,000 kilometers.

If your Check Engine light comes on, especially if it’s flashing, get your car looked at right away. Technicians at Mobile Tune Up and Repair handle emission problems everyday. You might have exhaust or emissions trouble if your car is difficult to start, runs rough, is noisy or smoking. Call Mobile Tune Up and Repair at 281-463-4211 to schedule an appointment if you experience these problems.

Let’s review the exhaust system. We will start from the top and start with the exhaust manifold. That is the part that attaches to the engine and collects the exhaust from the cylinders and directs it into the exhaust pipe. Exhaust gaskets help seal the connection with the manifold and various other joints along the way. If the manifold is cracked or loose, or a gasket is leaking, dangerous gases could escape into the passenger compartment, where you ride. Carbon monoxide can be deadly, so it is important that your exhaust system doesn’t leak. The exhaust pipes connect the various components. They can rust or be damaged by a rock, so they need to be inspected periodically.

Next is the catalytic converter. This part looks like a muffler. It changes chemicals that are dangerous to your health and the environment into harmless carbon dioxide and water. It doesn’t require any maintenance itself. But eventually they wear out. You will find this out when your car fails an emissions inspection.

Now the muffler. Its main job is to quiet engine noises. Mufflers work by either absorbing or baffling sound. And you can actually customize your car’s sound with different mufflers – anything from whisper quiet to bad-boy rumbley. Rusted or road-damaged mufflers can leak and need to be replaced right away.

The exhaust system is attached to the car by a series of hangers and clamps. These fasteners hold the system in place. When hangers come loose or break, hot exhaust components can touch and melt wires, hoses and lines.

Finally, we end at the tailpipe. This is the final outlet for the exhaust. These can be plain-Jane or pretty flashy. Also, the oxygen sensors monitor the oxygen content of the exhaust so the engine control computer can adjust the fuel-to-air mix to keep the car running right.

Exhaust and emissions service covers plain old pipes and high-tech computers. It impacts everything from life and death safety due to exhaust leaks, to fine-tuning the sound of your ride.

By Amanda Cox • February 26, 2013 • 7:15 pm • Leave a comment
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